ajennifer:

acumbercollectiveofhiddlestoners:

Natasha saving Sam and Steve

#not only does she pull steve’s head out of the way just in time#she also uses her leg to push sam out of the way of the bullet#this is something i never noticed before#but now i want to build an altar to it#reason 354 why natasha is my fave
ajennifer:

acumbercollectiveofhiddlestoners:

Natasha saving Sam and Steve

#not only does she pull steve’s head out of the way just in time#she also uses her leg to push sam out of the way of the bullet#this is something i never noticed before#but now i want to build an altar to it#reason 354 why natasha is my fave

A word of advice to trans women

orangelemonart:

interruptmag:

image

Go to your nearest target. Buy a two pack of pushup bras (24$ for 2), and target’s bra inserts (12$). Then go to your nearest Walmart and buy the Vasserette Control Shapewear Panties (2.50 each), they do wonders for helping your tuck. There you go! You just saved yourself a lot of money, you can afford to buy enough to wear every day, and best of all you look fabulous. -@twidx

recs for trans women are so rare on tumblr!! spread this, people.

(via ladydrace)

medievalpoc:

Math and Science Week!
aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:
Alhazen / Ibn al-Haytham
Here’s an Iraqi scientist who was one of the pioneers of modern science:
From Wikipedia:

Abū ʿAlī al-Ḥasan ibn al-Ḥasan ibn al-Haytham (Arabic: أبو علي، الحسن بن الحسن بن الهيثم‎), frequently referred to as Ibn al-Haytham (Arabic: ابن الهيثم, Latinized as Alhazen or Alhacen; c. 965 – c. 1040) was an Arab scientist, polymath, mathematician, astronomer and philosopher who made significant contributions to the principles of optics, astronomy, mathematics, visual perception and the scientific method.
He has been described as the father of modern optics, experimental physics and scientific methodology and could also claim to be the first theoretical physicist. In medieval Europe, he was nicknamed Ptolemaeus Secundus (“Ptolemy the Second”) or simply called “The Physicist”. He is also sometimes called al-Basri (Arabic: البصري) after Basra, his birthplace.
…
According to one version of his biography, al-Haytham, confident about the practical application of his mathematical knowledge, assumed he could regulate the floods of the Nile. Having been ordered to do so by Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah, the sixth ruler of the Fatimid caliphate, he quickly realised its impossibility. Fearing for his life, he feigned madness and was placed under house arrest. Once Al-Hakim had died, he was able to prove that he was not mad and for the rest of his life made money copying texts while writing mathematical works and teaching.

A POC mad scientist! I demand fan fic immediately. :D
Sources for the pics above:
Abū ʿAlī al-Ḥasan ibn al-Ḥasan ibn al-Haytham as shown on the obverse of the 1982 Iraqi 10 dinar note[x]
Cover page for Latin translation of Alhazen’s The Book of OpticsEurope (1522)[x]
Frontispiece of Johannes Hevelius, Selenographia.Depictions of Alhasen [sic], Ibn al-Haytham, on the left, holding a geometrical diagram and symbolizing knowledge through reason and Galileo Galilei on the right, holding a telescope and symbolizing knowledge through the senses.Poland (1647)[x]
medievalpoc:

Math and Science Week!
aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:
Alhazen / Ibn al-Haytham
Here’s an Iraqi scientist who was one of the pioneers of modern science:
From Wikipedia:

Abū ʿAlī al-Ḥasan ibn al-Ḥasan ibn al-Haytham (Arabic: أبو علي، الحسن بن الحسن بن الهيثم‎), frequently referred to as Ibn al-Haytham (Arabic: ابن الهيثم, Latinized as Alhazen or Alhacen; c. 965 – c. 1040) was an Arab scientist, polymath, mathematician, astronomer and philosopher who made significant contributions to the principles of optics, astronomy, mathematics, visual perception and the scientific method.
He has been described as the father of modern optics, experimental physics and scientific methodology and could also claim to be the first theoretical physicist. In medieval Europe, he was nicknamed Ptolemaeus Secundus (“Ptolemy the Second”) or simply called “The Physicist”. He is also sometimes called al-Basri (Arabic: البصري) after Basra, his birthplace.
…
According to one version of his biography, al-Haytham, confident about the practical application of his mathematical knowledge, assumed he could regulate the floods of the Nile. Having been ordered to do so by Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah, the sixth ruler of the Fatimid caliphate, he quickly realised its impossibility. Fearing for his life, he feigned madness and was placed under house arrest. Once Al-Hakim had died, he was able to prove that he was not mad and for the rest of his life made money copying texts while writing mathematical works and teaching.

A POC mad scientist! I demand fan fic immediately. :D
Sources for the pics above:
Abū ʿAlī al-Ḥasan ibn al-Ḥasan ibn al-Haytham as shown on the obverse of the 1982 Iraqi 10 dinar note[x]
Cover page for Latin translation of Alhazen’s The Book of OpticsEurope (1522)[x]
Frontispiece of Johannes Hevelius, Selenographia.Depictions of Alhasen [sic], Ibn al-Haytham, on the left, holding a geometrical diagram and symbolizing knowledge through reason and Galileo Galilei on the right, holding a telescope and symbolizing knowledge through the senses.Poland (1647)[x]
medievalpoc:

Math and Science Week!
aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:
Alhazen / Ibn al-Haytham
Here’s an Iraqi scientist who was one of the pioneers of modern science:
From Wikipedia:

Abū ʿAlī al-Ḥasan ibn al-Ḥasan ibn al-Haytham (Arabic: أبو علي، الحسن بن الحسن بن الهيثم‎), frequently referred to as Ibn al-Haytham (Arabic: ابن الهيثم, Latinized as Alhazen or Alhacen; c. 965 – c. 1040) was an Arab scientist, polymath, mathematician, astronomer and philosopher who made significant contributions to the principles of optics, astronomy, mathematics, visual perception and the scientific method.
He has been described as the father of modern optics, experimental physics and scientific methodology and could also claim to be the first theoretical physicist. In medieval Europe, he was nicknamed Ptolemaeus Secundus (“Ptolemy the Second”) or simply called “The Physicist”. He is also sometimes called al-Basri (Arabic: البصري) after Basra, his birthplace.
…
According to one version of his biography, al-Haytham, confident about the practical application of his mathematical knowledge, assumed he could regulate the floods of the Nile. Having been ordered to do so by Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah, the sixth ruler of the Fatimid caliphate, he quickly realised its impossibility. Fearing for his life, he feigned madness and was placed under house arrest. Once Al-Hakim had died, he was able to prove that he was not mad and for the rest of his life made money copying texts while writing mathematical works and teaching.

A POC mad scientist! I demand fan fic immediately. :D
Sources for the pics above:
Abū ʿAlī al-Ḥasan ibn al-Ḥasan ibn al-Haytham as shown on the obverse of the 1982 Iraqi 10 dinar note[x]
Cover page for Latin translation of Alhazen’s The Book of OpticsEurope (1522)[x]
Frontispiece of Johannes Hevelius, Selenographia.Depictions of Alhasen [sic], Ibn al-Haytham, on the left, holding a geometrical diagram and symbolizing knowledge through reason and Galileo Galilei on the right, holding a telescope and symbolizing knowledge through the senses.Poland (1647)[x]

medievalpoc:

Math and Science Week!

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Alhazen / Ibn al-Haytham

Here’s an Iraqi scientist who was one of the pioneers of modern science:

From Wikipedia:

Abū ʿAlī al-Ḥasan ibn al-Ḥasan ibn al-Haytham (Arabic: أبو علي، الحسن بن الحسن بن الهيثم‎), frequently referred to as Ibn al-Haytham (Arabic: ابن الهيثم, Latinized as Alhazen or Alhacen; c. 965 – c. 1040) was an Arab scientist, polymath, mathematician, astronomer and philosopher who made significant contributions to the principles of optics, astronomy, mathematics, visual perception and the scientific method.

He has been described as the father of modern optics, experimental physics and scientific methodology and could also claim to be the first theoretical physicist. In medieval Europe, he was nicknamed Ptolemaeus Secundus (“Ptolemy the Second”) or simply called “The Physicist”. He is also sometimes called al-Basri (Arabic: البصري) after Basra, his birthplace.

According to one version of his biography, al-Haytham, confident about the practical application of his mathematical knowledge, assumed he could regulate the floods of the Nile. Having been ordered to do so by Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah, the sixth ruler of the Fatimid caliphate, he quickly realised its impossibility. Fearing for his life, he feigned madness and was placed under house arrest. Once Al-Hakim had died, he was able to prove that he was not mad and for the rest of his life made money copying texts while writing mathematical works and teaching.

A POC mad scientist! I demand fan fic immediately. :D

Sources for the pics above:

Abū ʿAlī al-Ḥasan ibn al-Ḥasan ibn al-Haytham as shown on the obverse of the 1982 Iraqi 10 dinar note
[x]

Cover page for Latin translation of Alhazen’s The Book of Optics
Europe (1522)
[x]

Frontispiece of Johannes Hevelius, Selenographia.
Depictions of Alhasen [sic], Ibn al-Haytham, on the left, holding a geometrical diagram and symbolizing knowledge through reason and Galileo Galilei on the right, holding a telescope and symbolizing knowledge through the senses.
Poland (1647)
[x]

simonjpg:

went in strong, came out crying over a CGI tree voiced by vin diesel 

(via hardrockdean)

karenkavett:


"BUT WHAT ABOUT THE MEN?!" - Is Feminism Sexist? by marinashutup

This video should be required watching. Just, for everyone.
karenkavett:


"BUT WHAT ABOUT THE MEN?!" - Is Feminism Sexist? by marinashutup

This video should be required watching. Just, for everyone.
karenkavett:


"BUT WHAT ABOUT THE MEN?!" - Is Feminism Sexist? by marinashutup

This video should be required watching. Just, for everyone.
karenkavett:


"BUT WHAT ABOUT THE MEN?!" - Is Feminism Sexist? by marinashutup

This video should be required watching. Just, for everyone.
karenkavett:


"BUT WHAT ABOUT THE MEN?!" - Is Feminism Sexist? by marinashutup

This video should be required watching. Just, for everyone.
karenkavett:


"BUT WHAT ABOUT THE MEN?!" - Is Feminism Sexist? by marinashutup

This video should be required watching. Just, for everyone.
karenkavett:


"BUT WHAT ABOUT THE MEN?!" - Is Feminism Sexist? by marinashutup

This video should be required watching. Just, for everyone.
karenkavett:


"BUT WHAT ABOUT THE MEN?!" - Is Feminism Sexist? by marinashutup

This video should be required watching. Just, for everyone.
karenkavett:


"BUT WHAT ABOUT THE MEN?!" - Is Feminism Sexist? by marinashutup

This video should be required watching. Just, for everyone.
karenkavett:


"BUT WHAT ABOUT THE MEN?!" - Is Feminism Sexist? by marinashutup

This video should be required watching. Just, for everyone.

karenkavett:

"BUT WHAT ABOUT THE MEN?!" - Is Feminism Sexist? by marinashutup

This video should be required watching. Just, for everyone.

(via marsza)

“Your voice sounds completely different in different languages. It alters your personality somehow. I don’t think people get the same feeling from you. The rhythm changes. Because the rhythm of the language is different, it changes your inner rhythm and that changes how you process everything.

When I hear myself speak French, I look at myself differently. Certain aspects will feel closer to the way I feel or the way I am and others won’t. I like that—to tour different sides of yourself. I often find when looking at people who are comfortable in many languages, they’re more comfortable talking about emotional stuff in a certain language or political stuff in another and that’s really interesting, how people relate to those languages.”
— Francois Arnaud for Interview Magazine (via bound2014)

(via awkward-crow)

tamorapierce:

femmenace-t:

pervocracy:

postwhitesociety:

hm

I think the “women are mysterious” thing can also come from:

1) Women actually being quite clear, but not telling men what they want to hear.  ”She said she doesn’t want to talk to me?  So many mixed messages and confusing signals!”

2) Women not having cheat codes.  ”I tried being nice, and she didn’t have sex with me.  I tried being an asshole, and she didn’t have sex with me.  Come on, there’s got to be some kind of solution to this puzzle!”

3) Women not being a hive mind.  ”First a woman told me that she likes guys with big muscles.  Then the very next day a woman told me she thinks muscles aren’t attractive at all.  Make up your mind, women!”

4) An individual woman doing something confusing, and instead of asking “why is she doing this now?” men ask “why do women always do this?”

Always reblog

I think the idea is not that “women are mysterious” so much as “I can’t be bothered to get to know the women around me like I’d get to know the men around me, so I’ve never bothered to find out that women’s brains work pretty much the same as men’s, individually.  I keep wanting to pop them off their necks and peer into the hole to see what’s inside there rather than, you know, talk with them.”

brbshittoavenge:

thescienceofjohnlock:

timekiller-s:

analyticisms:

Debunking the myth that Tumblr is only used and populated by kids.

unwrapping:

Age Ranges of Tumblr’s Global Audience:
Tumblr sees about 150 million global unique visitors monthly. comScore, an Internet analytics firm, averaged Tumblr’s age ranges over the first quarter of 2014 for both Dashboard and blog network traffic worldwide:

  • Ages 13 to 17: 15%
  • Ages 18 to 34: 41%
  • Ages 35 to 54: 29%
  • Ages 55 and up: 15%

"People are often really surprised to note that we have the same percentage of 55-plus-year-olds as we do 13-to-17-year-olds," said Danielle Strle (strle), Tumblr’s director of product for community and content, in an NPR webinar. “But over half of our audience is solidly in the 13-to-34 demographic.”

OLD PEOPLE REPRESENT! [swings cane around like it’s a light sabre. Come to think of it, a cane that looks like a light sabre would be kinda cool.]

[I don’t use a cane. Yet.]

I do use a cane sometimes, it has a skull handle.

WOW would you look at that, way more adults than teenagers on here. Obviously none of us old fogeys have lives. :D

dreamscape-inkscape:

There’s an awful lot of Sam sprawling in season 9, you know? The one where Sam sits on the top of the park bench, the one where he straddles the chair when confronting Crowley. 

We’ve never quite seen that before. Sam always used to sit quite normally. You know when it started, too? After “Road Trip.” What an interesting notion! You know what’s even cooler? The fact that perching is counted as a play for dominance.

But it’s something exclusive to season 9, no? Of course, what happened in season 9 to threaten Sam enough to make a subconscious play for dominance; oh wait. Gadreel possessed him for longer than he’s ever been possessed, and Sam was lied to by Dean about it.

Sam is reclaiming the dominance of his own body throughout season 9, and it’s in his body language. It’s even prevalent around Dean; that park scene, where Dean was standing? Sam sat on the back of the bench to look bigger. To make it so that Dean almost never gets to look down on him. When confronting Crowley, the King of Hell, he straddled a chair at Crowley’s level; superiority. He’s being daring with the King of Hell. When he splayed his arms in front of Gadreel? He looked bigger. More intimidating.

What do Dean, Gadreel, and Crowley have in common? They’ve wronged Sam. And Sam is telling them no, even subconsciously. 

(via samwinchesterappreciation)